Romeo and juliet orchard scene. Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 2 2019-01-26

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Act 2, Scene 1

romeo and juliet orchard scene

My husband is on earth, my faith in heaven; How shall that faith return again to earth, Unless that husband send it me from heaven By leaving earth? The goddess Diana the moon personified is sickly pale and envious of Juliet's beauty 6. They fall in love immediately. In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond, And therefore thou mayst think my havior light. Romeo gasps, and then launches into a paragraph's worth of great pick up lines. What unaccustom'd cause procures her hither? Juliet transports him from the dark into the light, moving Romeo to a higher spiritual plane. She speaks yet she says nothing: what of that? No: -- but it is the character of youth, and therefore Shakespeare has made his youthful man exhibit it: for Romeo is not a lover, nor any other individual modification of the human character; he has, in fact, no individual and determinate character at all, but is a general specimen of man -- a pure abstraction of our human nature -- at that particular period of its being which occurs exactly between boyhood and maturity, and which we call, by way of distinction, the period of Youth. In other words, if he wants to marry her, he should propose.

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Romeo and Juliet Summary: Short Scene by Scene Summary of Romeo and Juliet

romeo and juliet orchard scene

Being in night, all this is but a dream, 140 Too flattering-sweet to be substantial. The tercel-gentle was appropriated to the prince, and thence was chosen by Juliet as an appellation for her beloved Romeo. Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Be not her maid, since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. The orchard walls are high and hard to climb, And the place death, considering who thou art, If any of my kinsmen find thee here. Romeo, that she were, O, that she were. It is my lady; O, it is my love! The Capulets and Montagues feel really stupid and end their feud.

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Romeo and Juliet Summary: Short Scene by Scene Summary of Romeo and Juliet

romeo and juliet orchard scene

To wreak the love I bore my cousin Upon his body that slaughter'd him! Benvolio comes up with the brilliant idea of crashing the party and introducing Romeo to some Verona hotties to make him forget about Rosaline. Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise: An you be mine, I'll give you to my friend; And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, For, by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee, Nor what is mine shall never do thee good: Trust to't, bethink you; I'll not be forsworn. Since there were few stage directions in Shakespeare's plays, actors would have to interpret lines such as this to show different addresses with body language, volume, and tone. Romeo makes himself known and disowns his name. While scholars have successfully read both interpretations into the line, what is most important to recognize in this exchange is that Juliet checks Romeo's haste. She is torn between what she should do with what she wants to do.

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Romeo and Juliet Act 2, scene 2 Summary & Analysis

romeo and juliet orchard scene

The moon changes shape every night. Romeo not only uses celestial imagery and mythological references to present Juliet as the most beautiful girl he has ever laid his eyes upon but also religious is used to convey this. Benvolio and Mercutio discuss the duel and Tybalts talent as a duelist when Romeo enters the scene. Parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say good night till it be morrow. This rapid engagement and marriage could be seen as more evidence of the backwards world created by their parent's feud. Delius points out that this word recalls their first meeting when, as a pilgrim, Romeo had thus greeted Juliet. In scene 2, Paris asks Lord Capulet permission to marry his daughter Juliet.


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Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 2 Translation

romeo and juliet orchard scene

So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called, Retain that dear perfection which he owes Without that title. O, it is my love! Through his metaphor he attributes these connotations to her. I would gladly stick to the proper manners of courtship and deny everything I said. I do, with all my heart; And yet no man like he doth grieve my heart. Marriage and courtship were much different in Shakespeare's time. Original Text Translated Text Source: Romeo comes forward.

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Act 2, Scene 1

romeo and juliet orchard scene

Shakespeare did not include this stage direction and it is not in Q1 or the First Folio. She recognizes his voice even though she hasn't heard even a hundred words from him. As Juliet is giving her vows to Romeo, the Nurse calls from within the Capulet Mansion, interrupting the vow Juliet is giving to Romeo. I am too bold; 'tis not to me she speaks. O, speak again, bright angel! Be not her maid since she is envious. Day begins to break over the orchard and Romeo exits the scene. It is not a substitute for reading it.

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Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare: Summary Act 2

romeo and juliet orchard scene

Juliet has to run inside when the Nurse calls, but she tells Romeo not to go too far—she'll be right back. Madam, if you could find out but a man To bear a poison, I would temper it; That Romeo should, upon receipt thereof, Soon sleep in quiet. I'll send to one in Mantua, Where that same banish'd runagate doth live, Shall give him such an unaccustom'd dram, That he shall soon keep Tybalt company: And then, I hope, thou wilt be satisfied. Fain would I dwell on form. Thou art thyself, though not a Montague. O, be some other name! Juliet compares herself to the spoiled child and Romeo to the shackled bird.

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Romeo and Juliet Full Text

romeo and juliet orchard scene

Shakespeare may have used metaphors of birds because the characters are held back and held down by their situations. I am no pilot; yet, wert thou as far As that vast shore washed with the farthest sea, I should adventure for such merchandise. Juliet does not know that Romeo can hear her. When she leaves the stage, we finally hear a full metaphor in which Romeo compares love's desire for love to a boy's desire to avoid his school books. Her eye in heaven Would through the airy region stream so bright That birds would sing and think it were not night. The actions and responses of others emphasize the division that is supposed to be between Romeo and Juliet and what makes it so moving is that we, the audience, knows what this division will bring about at the end of the play.

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Act 2, Scene 1

romeo and juliet orchard scene

Romeo and Juliet themselves are trying to break free of these earthly concerns. He blames Romeo and curses both the Montagues and Capulets. Wife, we scarce thought us blest That God had lent us but this only child; But now I see this one is one too much, And that we have a curse in having her: Out on her, hilding! What if her eyes were there, they in her head? Part of her feels like she should put on an act and pretend she's not interested in him, because that's the way girls in her social class are supposed to act. An if thou couldst, thou couldst not make him live; Therefore, have done: some grief shows much of love; But much of grief shows still some want of wit. Shakespeare would have used religious imagery as religion was a part of everyday life in Elizabethan times, without religious imagery it would be strange for a play in Elizabethan times.

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Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 2 Translation

romeo and juliet orchard scene

O, that I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch that cheek! That this is not a general, but a particular, remark is, I think, proved by the answering rhyme, as Staunton has noticed. Romeo, slick as ever, says her eyes are more dangerous than swords. And her eyes in the night sky would shine so brightly that birds would start singing, thinking it was day. He feels the same way leaving Juliet as young boys feel about going to school: it's a drag. Rise, beautiful sun, and kill the jealous moon , which is already sick and pale with grief because Juliet, her maid, is more beautiful than she is. This change, however, is not sudden but gradual change as conveyed by the text. Scene 2 — Juliet consents to marry Paris.

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